Archive for the ‘Post-Processing’ Category

Your Most Used Lens, Apertures & Focal Lengths?

April 5, 2014

Summary – Do you know which lenses you use most? Which apertures? Focal lengths? How much these answers depend on your subject matter? Use a good Digital Asset Manager (DAM) and the answers are right at your finger tips almost instantly.

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Expensive Image

Cost me an 18-200 lens to make this shot

(Good news is it was a crummy lens and I’m glad to be rid of it)


My Data

Images – Over 200,000

Music – Over 4,000 tracks

Documents - Nearly 2,000 books, manuals, tax returns, etc.

This post is based on

A small (20%) subset of the total data


Can your image organizer do this?

My DAM program of choice is IMatch

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1. Show photo counts by camera used?

I queried specifically for my Nikon cameras

2014-04-03_11-52-55

Figure 1

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2. How about an even more specific query

a. Only the D800E, and

b. Only photos while on vacation or at Shenandoah National Park

2014-04-03_11-15-52

Figure 2

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2014-04-03_11-24-57

Figure 3

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Why would you ever ask questions like this?

How about if you’re going to shoot a specific location or subject

And – you’d like to know which

Camera and lens combo would be most useful

And – if you’re like me

You’d rather not drag along everything you own

For example, Figure 1 shows that I use the D300 a lot

Suppose I were doing a vacation or Shenandoah trip

If I took only the D300,

What lenses should I take with it?

2014-04-04_14-54-49

Figure 4

The answer based on Figure 4 is obvious

Especially knowing the 18-200 was broken in half

On a vacation to Acadia (check it out; impressive)

The 18-70 and 75-300 will cover 99% of my needs, and

Between the two they cover for the broken 18-200


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Image Retrieval using Exif Data

March 29, 2014

Summary – Retrieving images requires that images have identifying data associated with them. This data can be something explicitly added by the photographer (post-capture) or something automatically added by a camera (at capture).


2014-03-27_14-24-47Infrared Image

Retrieved based solely on camera & lens Exif data

(and my knowledge of the camera/lens combo I use for IR)

 


Background

Exif data are collected by digital cameras at capture and

Embedded within the image file itself

The data includes:

Date and time

Camera settings including

Static information such as the camera make and model and

Information that varies with each image such as orientation, aperture, shutter speed, focal length, metering mode, and ISO

A thumbnail for previewing the picture

Descriptions

Copyright information

Image processing software can access & use this data

Some powerful retrieval capabilities

Need nothing more than an image’s Exif data

Of course some DAM software

Can make better use of it than others

but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. – See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf


Can your image organizer do this?

This demonstrates finding a collection of

Infrared images without first adding

Image specific data to any of the images

The only data used is the Exif data

Automatically embedded by the digital camera

And the DAM’s (IMatch) ability to filter by color content

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Click on any image to enlarge it

1. This is where we start

A test database containing 45K+ images

2014-03-27_12-15-43

2. IMatch automatically creates the following

It checks each image’s Exif and creates

A Camera Make/Model category based on what it finds

I’ve checked the two I want to use in this example

One of these was converted to IR

I don’t recall which so I’ll use both

2014-03-27_12-13-47

3. IMatch also creates this

Lens category

The lens I’ve checked is the one I use for IR

The IR conversion was “tuned” to this lens

2014-03-27_12-17-09

4. IMatch has a set of filters

Illustrated below is one that retrieves based on color content

I’ve set it up here to retrieve B&W images

2014-03-27_12-18-30

5. IMatch provides a powerful category based retrieval

I’ll illustrate it here using

The Camera & Lens categories shown above
By simply dragging and dropping the categories I want
I “built” this retrieval query
To retrieve all images made with
Either of the two D70 models while using the 18-70 zoom lens

2014-03-27_12-19-47

6. Next I ran the D70, 18-70 query shown above

It retrieved 2,092 (see upper right corner) matching images from the 45K total

The green check shows 2,232; the extra 140 are versions of originals

2014-03-27_12-20-46

7. Last, I ran the built-in color filter

This step reduced the 2,092 from step 6 to 93

There are other ways to have found these IR images
But not without user added non-Exif data
I relied on personal knowledge (camera & lens I used for IR)
This illustrates the power of
Using nothing but Exif data coupled with the right DAM software
The above steps (from 45K to 93)
Took about a minute from start to finish
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Could your image organizer have done this?

2014-03-27_12-21-49


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Digital Asset Management (DAM) – Image Retrieval

March 25, 2014

Summary – Being able to find an image quickly, in a collection of over 200K, is my main reason for using a DAM program. I can find what I’m looking for in seconds >90% of the time  – a minute or two worst case, but never ever never.

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00122_a dscn3325_nc4-dlite_pwp-clrbal-1_pse_pwp-cropblogStepping Out

A quick retrieval

Want to know create this effect?

A short & simple explanation is here


Background

Images – Over 200,000

Music – Over 4,000 tracks

Documents - Nearly 2,000 books, manuals, tax returns, etc.

My DAM program of choice is IMatch


Data Retrieval

This isn’t going to be an image retrieval tutorial series

A simple internet search will provide that

Instead, as I work my way through the upcoming

New release of IMatch

I’ll show examples of what is possible

And ask -

Can your image organizer do this?

Click on any image below for a larger view

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1. Find a set of images based on location?

Sure.

Basic & easy for almost any image organizer.

 

2014-03-24_14-22-19

2. How about a subset of those images?

Those that depicted winter scenes?

Now it’s getting a bit trickier

2014-03-24_14-25-423. How about a subset of the winter scenes?

Three of those scenes had man-made structures?

Can you eliminate them?

Yes?

2014-03-24_14-28-374. Can you refine the search even further?

The far right image above has geese (fauna) in it

Can you eliminate fauna?

2014-03-24_14-35-28

5. Now – how about adding a special case

After all of the above, I’d like to also include

Any “Out-of-Frame” images

 

2014-03-24_14-32-36

 

Maybe a bit contrived, but this illustrates

Retrieval flexibility

Each step shown above was the result of

A drag & drop step that took maybe 5 seconds

And – the subsequent retrieval took another five

Not only flexible, but fast

One last thought, if you’re a Lightroom organizer fan

The image files & database are on a network drive

Network drives aren’t allowed in LR

I can access this from any computer in the house

And – remotely via the internet

Do that in LR :)

Now – imagine winnowing out that same set of four

From over 200K image files

Same sequence of steps & the same (roughly) time

Can your image organizer do this??


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Exploring Digital Asset Management (DAM)

March 19, 2014

Summary – The 1st post in a series on the management of digital files. This topic applies to each & every one of us as photographers. Further, it transcends every photographic genre, every personal style and every camera. Simply stated, we all need DAM to some degree.


barebottom2Bare Bottom

Not a Selfie (1937; do parents still do this?)

I queried my database to show me all images made prior to 2000

It came up with 63 scans of family photos

Nothing else; I didn’t shoot pre-2000

This is probably the 1st photo of me; I’ve grown a beard since then ;-)


Why Am I Doing This?

“Stuff accumulates”

Occasionally stuff needs to be found

Stuff isn’t much of an asset if it can’t be retrieved

In 2007 my image count, after 5 years “in-the-game”

Reached unmanageable numbers (without DAM help)

Leading to my 1st foray into the world of DAM

For the next 4-5 years I was

Conscientious in my use of the tools

Then less so

Files still went into the DAM system

But I was lax in adding keywords & the like

So the images were stored & safe, but

Harder to retrieve than need be

Today – Sinner, repent! ;-)

My DAM program of choice (IMatch)

Is coming out with a major, major new release

Several years in the making

The changes are major (did I say major earlier? then huge)

This series of posts are mainly study notes to myself

Emphasis will be on search and retrieval

I’ll include examples

Often asking interested readers (all 2 or 3 of you)

Can your system do this?

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Digital Assets I Manage

Images – Over 200,000

Music – Over 4,000 tracks

Documents - Nearly 2,000 books, manuals, tax returns, etc.

—————————————-

Digital Asset Management functions

Ingest – Adding files to a central repository

I use Downloader Pro to automatically download, organize, and rename images and image data (metadata)

Store – Preserve files for their lifetime including updating & restoring

I use a number of storage devices (local network & dedicated) and

A number of data backup related programs

Local network ≠ Cloud

(I use clouds for sharing, not permanent storage)

Annotate – Adding text, graphics, and other elements to files in a non-destructive way

Catalog – Directory of information allowing assets to be quickly retrieved

Retrieve – Searching, finding, accessing digital assets

I use IMatch for the latter three functions


Can your image organizer do this?

Retrieve just your B&W images

Based solely on color

No user added metadata

Just the image pixel colors

Straight from the box as the vendor made the program?

With no input from you other than your images??

Using a 25,000 image test database for right now

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Click for full screen

3-16-2014 1-15-09 PMThere I am again

This time with a beard

That one is a selfie, unlike the bare bottom


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Photoshop + Pizza = Swimsuit Model

March 15, 2014

Summary – You’ve read about retouching for ads – not just a model’s face, but body as well. Here’s a humorous example.

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Here is the process in reverse

From model to pizza

2014-03-10_8-06-58

Just another example of

My searching far & wide

To help you improve your photography


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