Better Photographic Seeing – via Abstracts

Summary – Did you know that learning to make abstract images can make your representational (non-abstract) photography better? It can. Today – better seeing.

Abstract photography teaches you to see better

Seeing is the essential first step

For all forms of photography, but

Especially for abstract imagery

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Here are two examples –

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#1 – When a tree isn’t just a tree

I’m a volunteer photographer for

The National Park Service

Over several years this tree

Appeared in numerous images in one form or another

Certainly not an abstract as it stands (no longer standing, RIP 😦 )

But – under the right circumstances it could be

If you look and see the possibilities

Hint: It starts with not seeing a tree

See it for what it really is –

Shapes, lines & colors

Abstracts are made of just forms & colors

You’re off to a good start

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Abstract shot on another day at sunset


#2 – Abstracts are everywhere

Even right under your nose 😉

They just need to be seen

This example is a work in progress

Saw it for the 1st time this morning

Coming to breakfast

Had left a tablet on the table last night

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Both images hand-held (just experimenting for now)

Left D800E (overkill); right a point & shoot


The lamp is from my “past life”

As a hobby I dabbled in stained glass

This was my first lamp that I designed & made

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Next post –

Improved photographic creativity through abstract imagery

Example #2 is a form of this

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Don’t forget the International Abstract Photography Exhibit

Entries close March 31st; it’s free

Entry details are here

The gallery is here


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