Image Retrieval using Exif Data

Summary – Retrieving images requires that images have identifying data associated with them. This data can be something explicitly added by the photographer (post-capture) or something automatically added by a camera (at capture).


2014-03-27_14-24-47Infrared Image

Retrieved based solely on camera & lens Exif data

(and my knowledge of the camera/lens combo I use for IR)

 


Background

Exif data are collected by digital cameras at capture and

Embedded within the image file itself

The data includes:

Date and time

Camera settings including

Static information such as the camera make and model and

Information that varies with each image such as orientation, aperture, shutter speed, focal length, metering mode, and ISO

A thumbnail for previewing the picture

Descriptions

Copyright information

Image processing software can access & use this data

Some powerful retrieval capabilities

Need nothing more than an image’s Exif data

Of course some DAM software

Can make better use of it than others

but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. – See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

– See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

– See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf

With digital cameras, this has all changed. On each and every shot, the camera records not only the date and time, but all the other camera settings used to record the photo. That includes the shutter speed, aperture setting, ISO setting, is the flash was used, the focal length and lots lots more.

This is stored with the photo in what is called EXIF data inside your jpeg file (not technically correct, as EXIF is actually a file format, but it’s good enough for our discussion). When you copy the image to your computer, the EXIF data is copied as well, as a part of the image.

– See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/38/what-is-exif/#sthash.zfHsozJe.dpuf


Can your image organizer do this?

This demonstrates finding a collection of

Infrared images without first adding

Image specific data to any of the images

The only data used is the Exif data

Automatically embedded by the digital camera

And the DAM’s (IMatch) ability to filter by color content

.

Click on any image to enlarge it

1. This is where we start

A test database containing 45K+ images

2014-03-27_12-15-43

2. IMatch automatically creates the following

It checks each image’s Exif and creates

A Camera Make/Model category based on what it finds

I’ve checked the two I want to use in this example

One of these was converted to IR

I don’t recall which so I’ll use both

2014-03-27_12-13-47

3. IMatch also creates this

Lens category

The lens I’ve checked is the one I use for IR

The IR conversion was “tuned” to this lens

2014-03-27_12-17-09

4. IMatch has a set of filters

Illustrated below is one that retrieves based on color content

I’ve set it up here to retrieve B&W images

2014-03-27_12-18-30

5. IMatch provides a powerful category based retrieval

I’ll illustrate it here using

The Camera & Lens categories shown above
By simply dragging and dropping the categories I want
I “built” this retrieval query
To retrieve all images made with
Either of the two D70 models while using the 18-70 zoom lens

2014-03-27_12-19-47

6. Next I ran the D70, 18-70 query shown above

It retrieved 2,092 (see upper right corner) matching images from the 45K total

The green check shows 2,232; the extra 140 are versions of originals

2014-03-27_12-20-46

7. Last, I ran the built-in color filter

This step reduced the 2,092 from step 6 to 93

There are other ways to have found these IR images
But not without user added non-Exif data
I relied on personal knowledge (camera & lens I used for IR)
This illustrates the power of
Using nothing but Exif data coupled with the right DAM software
The above steps (from 45K to 93)
Took about a minute from start to finish
.
Could your image organizer have done this?

2014-03-27_12-21-49


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